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Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of effects of pupils perceptions of teachers feelings on classroom behaviour. found in the catalog.

effects of pupils perceptions of teachers feelings on classroom behaviour.

Graham Horner

effects of pupils perceptions of teachers feelings on classroom behaviour.

by Graham Horner

  • 148 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

ContributionsDidsbury College of Education. Centre for Studies in Educational Handicap.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13768993M

Highlights Extends previous research on class size effects on classroom processes. Examines whether effects varied by pupil attainment level and primary vs. secondary. Pupils had more individual attention and active teacher interactions in small classes. Pupil classroom engagement decreased in large classes, especially for low attainers. Results similar for primary and secondary by: The purpose of this study is to update the research regarding perceptions of specific challenging behaviors that teachers find to be most prevalent and/or problematic. This study analyzes the role of teacher demographics (gender, race, grade level, and years of experience) on their perceptions of specifically defined challenging by:

Third, a clearer picture of the current state of classrooms as seen through the eyes of teachers can provide information to the field and debunk current perceptions often perpetuated by the media (e.g., that high magnitude incidents of aggression and disruption are the major behaviors teacher face today; Landrum, Scott, & Lingo, ). Teachers have reported both positive attitudes toward the inclusion as well as strong negative feelings about having students with various disabilities in the general education classroom (Avramidis et al., , p. ). However, existing research has primarily focused on teachers’ perspectives of Cited by:

perceptions of students and teachers. It is henceforth imperative to study the teachers’ and students’ perception of physics classroom learning environment in senior secondary schools since science without physics is incomplete and because there can be no technological advancement without physics. Teachers’ perceptions of classroom behaviour and working memory Tracy Packiam Alloway Centre for Memory and Learning in the Lifespan, Stirling University, Stirling, Scotland. E-mail: [email protected] Accepted 3 February, Working memory, ability to remember and manipulate information, is crucial to academic Size: 57KB.


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Effects of pupils perceptions of teachers feelings on classroom behaviour by Graham Horner Download PDF EPUB FB2

As atmosphere in the classroom affects pupils' engagement and behaviour, focusing on supporting pupils' engagement may be more effective than concentrating on consequences and punishments. The following hypotheses were formulated in order to measure the effect of teachers’ perceptions on teacher-pupil relationships on pupils’ behaviour: H There is a significant difference in the mean scores of teachers’ perceptions of teacher-pupil closeness relationship for “good” and “bad” pupils.

HFile Size: KB. Abstract Research confirms that teachers have substantial impacts on their students’ academic and life-long success. However, little is known about specific dimensions of teaching practice that explain these relationships or whether these effects differ between academic and “non-cognitive” : David Blazar.

This study investigates the perceptions of Saudi Arabian primary school teachers in Years 4, 5 and 6 and discusses the effects of class size on teaching. The data comes from 30 teachers who teach small classes in two private schools, and 37 who teach large classes in two state schools in Alhafouf, Saudi Arabia.

The study discusses whether different numbers of students in class could have an Cited by: 1. (). Students’ Perceptions of Classroom Behaviour Problems and the Effectiveness of Different Disciplinary Methods. Educational Psychology: Vol. 25, No. 5, pp. Cited by:   Data Analysis. Findings pertinent to teachers' perceptions of students' problem behavior inside classroom are reported in this paper.

Data was analyzed by using general qualitative analyses techniques [].First level of coding was conducted by a colleague who has a Bachelor degree of Psychology and teaching by: As expected, the relation between coping behaviour and pupils’ time-on-task was less strong in other classroom events (e.g., instruction or classroom organisation).

Conclusions. Teacher and Teaching Effects on Students' Academic Performance, Attitudes, and Behaviors The Harvard community has made this article openly available.

Please share how this access benefits you. Your story matters Citation Blazar, David. Teacher and Teaching Effects on Students' Academic Performance, Attitudes, and Behaviors. Doctoral. The effect of teacher interpersonal behaviour on students’ subject-specific motivation analysis only to a limited degree, and by our knowledge none of the studies has corrected the effects of interpersonal behaviour for prior motivation.

When studying motivation, educational researchers often distinguish between motivational personality File Size: 71KB. long-term success. We find that upper-elementary teachers have large effects on self-reported measures of students’ self-efficacy in math, and happiness and behavior in class.

Students’ attitudes and behaviors are predicted by teaching practices most proximal to these measures, including teachers’ emotional support and classroom Size: KB.

This study aimed to examine the conceptions of junior secondary school student misbehaviors in classroom, and to identify the most common, disruptive, and unacceptable student problem behaviors from teachers' perspective.

Twelve individual interviews with teachers were conducted. A list of 17 student problem behaviors was generated. Results showed that the most common and disruptive Cited by: discusses the effects of class size on teaching. The data comes from 30 teachers who teach small classes in two private schools, and 37 who teach large classes in two state schools in Alhafouf, Saudi Arabia.

The study discusses whether different numbers of students in class could have an impact on teachers’ perceptions and teaching practices. Effects of teacher misbehavior on pupils. Teachers are pivotal to student perceptions of learning, facilitating or inhibiting student learning. Several studies focused on identifying those interactions between teachers and pupils that most influence the quality of their by: of teachers in managing problem behaviour and its effects on the educator’s quality of life in the workplace.

Morrison Bennett and Bratton () refer to conscious discipline as teachers aim ‘to build character, relationships and social skills’. The increase in learners’ misbehaviour at school is one of. To find out the perceptions of teachers about classroom management problems in government secondary schools district Chitral.

To ask from teachers in government secondary schools in district Chitral about the effects of classroom management on the quality of teaching and learning. Size: KB. of elementary teachers feel well qualified to teach science, especially when asked to use the currently-preferred inquiry approach.

Perhaps this is because most, but not all, elementary teachers in the classroom today were not taught using a hands-on method while students in elementary school (Nabors, ), and are thereforeFile Size: KB. A Qualitative Study of Effective School Discipline Practices: Perceptions of Administrators, Tenured Teachers, and Parents in Twenty Schools by Mary Fa ye Nelson Many educators and parents are gravely concerned about disorder and danger in school environments.

In addition to school discipline issues, American classrooms are frequentlyCited by: 8. Students’ Perception of Teaching Behaviour and Its Effect on Evaluation Bettina Greimel-Fuhrmann. Vienna University of Economics and Business. Abstract. This paper explores three different components of teaching behaviour – as it is perceived by the students – and their effect on students’ global ratings of their teachers by empirically testing a structuralAuthor: Bettina Greimel-Fuhrmann.

3. Results. Table 1 summarizes the categorization of responses based on students' perceptions of problem behaviors inside classroom reported by 18 student informants.

The responses could be classified into 19 main categories and six of them could further be divided into subcategories. The frequently reported classroom misbehaviors were “talking out of turn”, Cited by: 5.

Effect of Teachers’ Emotions on Their Students: Some Evidence competence, motivation, academic performance, classroom discipline, and social behavior. Furthermore, herein Students’ Emotions and Perceptions One of the first effects that we will describe is also one of the most evident.

Emotional contagion is a well-knownFile Size: 61KB. The present study sought to explore teachers' perceptions of behaviour problems at a secondary school where the second author was a teacher.

This study was initiated by a concern to clarify the perceptions of teachers at the school concerning problem behaviour by pupils with a .Pupils are given an active role in labelling pupils according to behaviour and ‘good’ pupils are afforded privileged status in the labelling process.

They not only reinforce who is a well behaved pupil, but also re-affirm their own status in light of the ‘ideal pupil’ concept.Teachers’ perception of disruptive behaviour in the classroom building a suitable living environment and develop strategies and measures to correct and prevent violence.

The results of the latest Teaching and Learning International Survey (OECD, ) also refl ect this situation. A platform toCited by: 2.